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IGHR 2022 Course Descriptions

Course One – Methods & Sources

Course Coordinator

Rebecca Whitman Koford, CG®, CGLSM

Description

Learn or review the processes for researching family history, from the basic building blocks found in the census to using the modern science of DNA to solve relationship mysteries. This foundation course at IGHR provides the tools you need to begin genealogical research, including how to read old handwriting; record, analyze, and cite research information; interview relatives to develop exciting stories; and explore the intriguing clues found in sources such as maps, newspapers, land, military, probate, and religious records. You’ll go on courthouse tour, where exercises will develop or expand your research abilities. Classes taught by experts in the field of genealogy will pique your interest and hone your skills. No prior genealogical experience is necessary; the course is suitable for beginners. However, it is also an excellent refresher course for those with prior experience.

Course Two – Intermediate Genealogy and Historical Studies

Course Coordinator

Angela Packer McGhie, CG®, FUGA

Description

This course is designed to help intermediate genealogists expand their knowledge of genealogical records and techniques. Instruction includes an exploration of a variety of genealogical sources including land, military, immigration, probate and court records. It will also highlight the use of DNA in genealogical research and provide practical exercises in evaluating genealogical evidence.

Course Three – Advanced Methodology and Evidence Analysis

Course Coordinator

Judy G. Russell, JD, CG®, CGLSM

Description

Building on the basics taught in Course 1 (Methods and Sources) and Course 2 (Intermediate Genealogy and Historical Studies), Course 3 is designed to develop and foster advanced skills by concentrating on problem-solving techniques. Its focus is on the proper application of the Genealogical Proof Standard (as explicated through BCG’s Genealogy Standards, 2019 version) to a wide variety of record types to solve complex research problems. Where beginning genealogy students need to learn what records exist to accurately identify their families, and intermediate genealogy students need to learn where records may be found, particularly those not readily available online, advanced genealogy students need to learn how to use records in ways that may be neither intuitive nor obvious to bridge the gaps left by time and record loss. Thus, the course has three fundamental objectives:

  • that students develop an understanding of the elements of advanced methodology;
  • that students develop a deeper understanding of the sources employed in advanced genealogical research; and,
  • that students begin to understand some of the problems involved in and research techniques designed to solve problems in complex or unique research domains.

Course Four – Writing and Publishing for Genealogists

Course Coordinator

Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG®, FASG, FUGA, FNGS

Description

Students registering for this course should be experienced family historians who want to develop skills for preparing compiled genealogies, articles, books, and reports. In activity-based classes, they will develop skills in writing, documentation, organizing, and self-editing and learn how to prepare products for publication in print and online. Besides activities, discussions, and lectures, the course will include three homework assignments. Before the course begins registered students will receive two articles to analyze and study. They also should bring a 500-word genealogical writing sample in a Microsoft Word–compatible format. 

Course Five – Genetics for Genealogists: Beginning DNA

Course Coordinator

Patti Lee Hobbs, CG®

Description

This course covers all the types of DNA (Y-DNA, mitochondrial DNA, X-DNA, and autosomal DNA) needed to incorporate genetic evidence into a genealogical study. Sessions are organized around the workflow used to answer genealogical questions related to branches of the same family. Most hands-on exercises and case study sessions will focus on incorporating DNA into a family study. Later exercises build on the earlier ones. Emphasis is on how DNA can strengthen a genealogical conclusion when correlated correctly with documentary evidence.

Course Six – Military Records II: Intermediate Research – Beyond the Basics

Course Coordinator

Michael L. Strauss, AG®

Description

Military Records II is the intermediate level course offered at IGHR and is intended to be an in-depth examination and analysis of military records beyond the introductory level of instruction that was provided in the Military Records I course. Students who attended the previous course were introduced to a broad range of records based chronologically by military conflict. This course is intended to start at the point where the previous course left off and take the student to the next level by digging deeper in the Compiled Military Service Records, Pensions, Private and Public Military Acts and Laws, and including State and Federal Bounty Land Warrants. Most of the classes will include critical thinking exercises giving the students an opportunity for practical applications of what new sources will be learned. Key terminology will also enhance the student journey through these additional records and to think deeper on other records that would lead to further advanced research. Attendees will also receive education and instruction in those organizations outside of the regular wars and military branches that were headed by and under the control of the military, including the Civilian Conservation Corps, United States Merchant Marines, United States Lighthouse Service, and the United States Life-Saving Service, all important to the fabric of our nation's history and national defense.    

Course Seven – Tracing Your English Ancestors

Course Coordinator

Paul Milner, MDiv, FUGA

Description

Students in this class may themselves be an immigrant from England or Wales, or their ancestors may have left in the 17th Century and are now struggling with where to begin, or could be from any period in between. The course will provide a sound understanding of what records have been created, nationally and locally, how they are organized, where they are stored, and which possibly have been transcribed, indexed or digitized. We will cover the fundamentals of the records, the laws that governed them, and build upon that using case studies and examples throughout the course. Students will have a good understanding of the records and where to look for further resources applicable to the period, political and geographical area of interest. Researchers of all levels of experience will find value in the course.

Course Eight – Land Records: Using Maps in Genealogical Research

Course Coordinator

Melinda Kashuba, PhD

Description

This course provides students with a broad exposure to maps that are helpful in genealogical and historical research. Participants learn map terminology and symbols that enhance the reading, interpretation, and comprehension of maps and other geographic materials.  All sessions emphasize the practical application of geographic information to assist in problem analysis and correlation of map data with other genealogical and historical information. Examples used in this class will be drawn primarily from the United States and Canada but many types of maps have European roots and the information conveyed in this class will assist students in understanding maps from other countries. By the end of this course, students will leave with increased confidence on how to locate, read, assess, and create maps for their own use.

Course Nine – Research in the South: Colonial States

Course Coordinator

J. Mark Lowe, FUGA

Description

This course is designed for the intermediate to advanced researcher. A solid understanding of genealogy basics is required to make use of the materials and concepts presented. Students must have experience in using census, county records, land records and general secondary records. Concepts addressed include migration, settlement patterns, religion, land, and geography. States covered: Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia.

Course Ten – Advanced Library Research: Law Libraries and Government Documents

Course Coordinators

Ben Spratling, JD and Patricia Walls Stamm CG®, CGLSM

Description

This course covers research methods for genealogists in law libraries and government documents.  It is designed for the advanced researcher.  A solid understanding of genealogy basics is required to make use of the techniques presented.  Course Ten is designed to develop advanced skills by concentrating on methods to effectively and efficiently locate relevant material within the two collections.

In the Advanced Library Research Government Documents portion, students delve into the different types of documents within the federal government. The course expands their knowledge and understanding of the branches of the Federal Government, the diverse responsibilities and the distinct reports and documents available to help in genealogical search.

Course Eleven – Researching African American Ancestors: Courthouse Records

Course Coordinator

Deborah A. Abbott, PhD

Description

Students will survey a variety of courthouse records created at the local, state, and federal level. Lectures will focus on documents relevant to African Americans with roots in the antebellum period and later. Students will gain hands-on experience in accessing and using these documents. Students should have available a laptop to complete class assignments.

Course Twelve – Intermediate DNA: Planning for and Conducting Research Using DNA and Documentary Sources

Course Coordinator

Karen Stanbary, MA, LCSW, CG®

Description

Students will bring their own genealogical problem to class and work individually and in small groups to plan for and conduct research using both genetic and documentary sources. The research will be detailed and analyzed in a Research Report to Self.

Course Thirteen – The Third and Fourth Waves: Researching Recent Immigrants to the United States of America

Course Coordinators

Rich Venezia and Marian L. Smith

Description

Recent immigrant ancestors often came to the United States of America to seek their fortune – or simply, better lives for their family. Along the way and once they arrived, they interacted with shipping companies, government departments, and many other agencies. The paper trail they left behind can be rich with genealogical information that greatly enhances the stories of these families, but these records are often underutilized or overlooked. The unique case of late 19th- and 20th-century immigrants is that, as federal laws were codified and strengthened, the paperwork needed to enter the USA, and continue to reside there, expanded exponentially. This course aims to dissect a host of records related to these recent immigrants, many of which are federal records housed at the National Archives or with other government agencies. It will be an in-depth exploration into these various record sets, why they’re useful, and how to access them. It is intended to be an advanced look at how to research deeply and learn even more about the lives and times of our recent immigrant ancestors. This course is not ethnicity-specific and will include examples about and record sets related to immigrants from all over the world.

Tuition Discounts

GGS Member Discount

A $50 tuition discount is available for current Georgia Genealogical Society (GGS) members during course registration checkout!

(Only one discount per email address is permitted.)

Join Georgia Genealogical Society (GGS) as part of your IGHR course registration to receive the member tuition discount!

The GGS member discount is included when you select the option to register for GGS membership (single or family) on the IGHR website at the same time you register for an IGHR course.

To receive the GGS member discount, you must use the applicable discount promotion code at the time of checkout – should you complete your registration without using the discount code, IGHR cannot reimburse you.

GGS Member Discount Codes

Current GGS members:

Use your Georgia Genealogical Society (GGS) registered email address as your tuition discount [promotion] code during course registration checkout.

New or renewing members:

Use FAMGGS for a discounted rate for GGS Family memberships + IGHR Course Registration

Use SINGGGS for a discounted rate for GGS Single memberships + IGHR Course Registration

To receive the GGS member discount, you must use the applicable discount promotion code at the time of checkout – should you complete your registration without using the discount code, IGHR cannot reimburse you.

(Uses other than tuition will be corrected and billed.)

Important IGHR Policies - Read Before Registering

Copyright Policy

Read IGHR’s copyright policy in Terms and Conditions.